VISSCHER, Nicolaes II (1649-1702). . "Moscoviae seu Russiae Magnae Generalis Tabula qua Lapponia, Norvegia, Suecia, Dania, Polonia, ... aliaeque Regiones adjacentes." Amsterdam: Nicolaes Visscher, c. 1690.

$ 1,800.00

VISSCHER, Nicolaes II (1649-1702). . "Moscoviae seu Russiae Magnae Generalis Tabula qua Lapponia, Norvegia, Suecia, Dania, Polonia, Maximaeque partesGermaniae, Tartariae, Turcici Imperii, aliaeque Regiones adjacentes." Amsterdam: Nicolaes Visscher, c. 1690.

Single sheet (22 ¼ x 19 ½) Full margins showing the plate mark. (Very light foxing along margin).

A stunning, hand-colored map of Russia, Moscow, and the adjoining countries which make up Eastern Europe. Taken from the Atlas Minor by Nicolaes Visscher, this map demonstrates the level of detail, decoration, and accuracy for which Visscher maps are famed. The title cartouche introduces us to the map, further embellished with cherubim, floral arrangement, and bears.
The center of this sought after map is the Tsardom of Russia. The term "Muscovy" refers to 'Tsardom', but this term has been used exclusively by Europeans, in Russia itself this name was entirely uncommon. The area shown reaches far into Europe, in the south of the north coast of Turkey can be seen. The Black Sea is named by its ancient Latin name of Euxine Sea. The Caspian Sea suffered ever so slightly in his account, from the lack of knowledge by European surveyors and cartographers with this area. This particularity adds a desirable quality to the map. In the north of the map fill passages open spaces in and around Novaya Zemlya. Oftentimes, cartography of the 17th century used this stylistic device known as a "filler", if geographic information were missing.

The Atlas Minor is a fine and comprehensive composite atlas, and one of a series of large atlases compiled and sold by the Visscher family of art dealers and cartographers in the 17th century. Founded by Nicholas Visscher, this work is known for the high quality of engraving, exceptionally fine ornament, and accurate geographical information. No two of the Visscher atlases seem to have been identical in content, and most contain, like this one, a selection of maps by the Visschers themselves as well as other cartographers. In this case the majority of the maps are published by Visscher. In addition to the striking world map by Allard with its black background and numerous projections, and found in the "Atlas Major" from about 1705, there are maps of the continents, regional maps of Europe, ten maps of Asia, and seven maps related to America.
For more information on this map, or a warm welcome to see other maps and books of our collection at 72nd Street NYC, please contact Natalie Zadrozna.