VISSCHER, Nicolaes II (1649-1702). ). "Ducatus Bremae et Ferdae, Maximaeque partis Ducatus Stormariae, Comitatus Oldenburgi, Albis, Visurgisque, Fluminium...". Amsterdam: Nicolaes Visscher, c. 1690.

$ 400.00

VISSCHER, Nicolaes II (1649-1702). ). "Ducatus Bremae et Ferdae, Maximaeque partis Ducatus Stormariae, Comitatus Oldenburgi, Albis, Visurgisque, Fluminium...". Amsterdam: Nicolaes Visscher, c. 1690.

Single sheet (22 ¼ x 19 ½) Full margins showing the plate mark. (light foxing & browning along margin, light offsetting).

A stunning original color map of the Duchies of Bremen and Verden, taken from Vissher's compiled Atlas Minor siue Geographia Compendiosa, Qua Orbis Terrarum, per paucas attamen novissimas tabulas ostenditu.
The map here is in excellent condition with the colors as vibrant and crisp. The borders are outlined in color to define the territories between the Duchies. Known for their high quality and embellishments, this Vissche map is no different. The gorgeous mannerist style title cartouche is decorated with flanking hounds, cherubim, and a Roman soldier - presumably to symbolize the Holy Roman Empire. The coat of arms of the Duchy sits above the title. The map exhibits a compasss rose and rhumb lines, a cartouched scale of miles, and
The formal Duchies of Bremen and Verden were two territories and immediate fiefs of the Holy Roman Empire. It emerged and gained immediacy in 1180. They were ruled by prince-bishops until 1648, when they were secularized and transformed into hereditary monarchies by constitution. From that moment on, both the Duchy of Bremen and that of Verden were always ruled in personal union, predominately by the royal houses in Sweden. It remained this way until 1808 and the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire; and their status as fiefs of immediacy became null and void. Bremen-Verden then merged into a state with the neighboring Kingdom of Hanover.

The Atlas Minor is a fine and comprehensive composite atlas, and one of a series of large atlases compiled and sold by the Visscher family of art dealers and cartographers in the 17th century. Founded by Nicholas Visscher, this work is known for the high quality of engraving, exceptionally fine ornament, and accurate geographical information. No two of the Visscher atlases seem to have been identical in content, and most contain, like this one, a selection of maps by the Visschers themselves as well as other cartographers. In this case the majority of the maps are published by Visscher. In addition to the striking world map by Allard with its black background and numerous projections, and found in the "Atlas Major" from about 1705, there are maps of the continents, regional maps of Europe, ten maps of Asia, and seven maps related to America.
For more information on this map, or a warm welcome to see other maps and books of our collection at 72nd Street NYC, please contact Natalie Zadrozna.