VISSCHER, Nicolaes II (1649-1702). Atlas Minor siue Geographia Compendiosa, Qua Orbis Terrarum, per paucas attamen novissimas tabulas ostenditur. "Scania Vulgo Schonen". Amsterdam: Nicolaes Visscher, 1690.

$ 600.00

VISSCHER, Nicolaes II (1649-1702). Atlas Minor siue Geographia Compendiosa, Qua Orbis Terrarum, per paucas attamen novissimas tabulas ostenditur. "Scania Vulgo Schonen". Amsterdam: Nicolaes Visscher, 1690.

Single sheet (22 ¼ x 19 ½) Full margins showing the plate mark. (Very light foxing along margin).
A handsome map of Scania, including parts of Zealand, Blekinge, and the Baltic Sea. The map was expertly arranged by Nicolaes Visscher, and is a part of his Atlas Minor (published c. 1690). Visscher is well-known for the depth of accuracy within his maps, and for embellishing the map's beauty further with small detailing.
Scania, also known by its local name Skåne, is found in the southernmost province of Sweden; which consists of a peninsula on the southern tip of the Scandinavian Peninsula and some islands close to it.
The map is beautifully decorated and lightly hand-colored to bring out the aesthetics of the map. This includes an elegant title cartouche, offering the title and a surrounding of sheep and bulls. The lower left corner provides a curious Scale of Miles, accompanied by a man (presumably Visscher) smiling to a little cherub, who is pointing to the country on a globe.

The Atlas Minor is a fine and comprehensive composite atlas, and one of a series of large atlases compiled and sold by the Visscher family of art dealers and cartographers in the 17th century. Founded by Nicholas Visscher, this work is known for the high quality of engraving, exceptionally fine ornament, and accurate geographical information. No two of the Visscher atlases seem to have been identical in content, and most contain, like this one, a selection of maps by the Visschers themselves as well as other cartographers. In this case the majority of the maps are published by Visscher. In addition to the striking world map by Allard with its black background and numerous projections, and found in the "Atlas Major" from about 1705, there are maps of the continents, regional maps of Europe, ten maps of Asia, and seven maps related to America.
For more information on this map, or a warm welcome to see other maps and books of our collection at 72nd Street NYC, please contact Natalie Zadrozna.