SANSON D'ABBEVILLE, Nicholas (1600-1667). Mappe-Monde, ou Carte Generale du Monde […] Paris: Chez P. Mariette, 1651.

$ 1,750.00

SANSON D'ABBEVILLE, Nicholas (1600-1667). Mappe-Monde, ou Carte Generale du Monde […] Paris: Chez P. Mariette, 1651.

Single sheet engraved map with full margins, original hand-color in outline
(17 x 22 ¼ inches sheet; 26 ½ x 32 inches framed)

A fantastic uncolored map depicting one of the earliest views of the World. This map was created by one of the single most important French cartographers of the 17th century, Nicholas Sanson D'Abbeville. This innovative approach to mapmaking redefined commercial cartography over the next 50 years and signal the beginning end of the Dutch domination over trade.
Sanson's noteworthy double hemisphere map of the world featuring his first depiction of the Island of California, using a model for the shape, which would be known as the first Sanson model. The map also provides a good look at the Great Lakes of North America, a region for which Sanson's regional maps would become the most advanced depiction of the cartography of the region for the next 30 years. It is one of the first maps to distinguish the Great Lakes with Lac Superior first named here. Lake Michigan, here called Lac des puans (lake of evil smells), is also introduced here. All five of the Great Lakes were not named until Sanson's 1656 map of New France. Neither Tasmania or New Zealand is shown. A faint outline of Terra Magellanica appears in the south reflecting the uncertainty of the time. Australia is only partially shown, and is labeled Beach after Marco Polo, with place names on the south and west coasts reflecting the Dutch discoveries as they pursued the East Indian spice trade.
The map is typical of Sanson's "scientific" style of cartography with no decorative elements. The map depicts a curious northwest Coast of America, separated from California by an unnamed strait a curious omission for someone as meticulous as Sanson. This NorthWest Coast would disappear from his subsequent maps. It was published in conjunction with Pierre Mariette (father and son), who published many of Sanson's work after 1645. For more information on this map, or a warm welcome to see other maps and books of our collection at 72nd Street NYC, please contact Natalie Zadrozna.