ENOUY, Joseph Christopher. The Continent and Islands of Europe, from the best Foreign Surveys etc. London: Richard H. Laurie, 12th May, 1822.

$ 9,500.00

4 sheets joined, float-mounted and framed (47 x 58 6/8 inches; framed size: 54 x 65 4/8 inches). Magnificent engraved wall map of Europe laid down on cartographical linen and trimmed with silk, with exceptionally fine original hand-colour in full, the title within an elaborate allegorical cartouche lower right (a little browned along the bottom edge).

THE FIRST CONFEDERATION OF EUROPE

A superb example of Enouy's rare wall map of Europe, "the divisions according to the Treaties of 1815, other additions to 1822".   This fine, detailed and beautiful wall-map shows Europe as it emerged from years of war with France. The Treaty of Paris was signed on the 20th of November 1815 following the decisive defeat of Napoleon Bonaparte at the Battle of Waterloo, and his subsequent and second abdication. In February of 1815, Napoleon had escaped from his exile on Elba, and by 20th March had re-entered Paris, beginning the Hundred Days of his restored rule. King Louis XVIII, who had fled France when Napoleon arrived in Paris, took the throne for a second time on 8 July. Although France's boundaries have been reduced to their pre-1790 positions, and heavy indemnities were imposed, a general desire amongst the coalition forces to see the Bourbon dynasty restored to power prevented the reparations from being harsher than they were. The treaty was signed for Great Britain by Lord Castlereagh and the Duke of Wellington and by the duc de Richelieu for France; parallel treaties with France were signed by Austria, Russia, and Prussia, forming in effect the first confederation of Europe. 

Laurie & Whittle was one of the foremost British cartographic firms of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. As the successors to Sayer & Bennett, who published Thomas Jefferys' groundbreaking "American Atlas," Laurie & Whittle became heirs to a legacy of international cartographic excellence and predominance.