REINER & OTTENS, Joshua. "Carte Nouvelle de Tout L'Empire de la Grande Russie Dans L'Estat Ou Il S'Este Trouve A La Mort De Pierre Le Grand . . ." Amsterdam: Reiner & Ottens, c 1720.

$ 850.00

REINER & OTTENS, Joshua. "Carte Nouvelle de Tout L'Empire de la Grande Russie Dans L'Estat Ou Il S'Este Trouve A La Mort De Pierre Le Grand . . ." Amsterdam: Reiner & Ottens, c 1720.

Single sheet (22 ¼ x 19 ½) Full margins showing the plate mark. (Very light foxing along margin).

A highly decorative and rare map showing Russia under the rule of Peter the Great (1672-1725). This map was found to be a part of Visscher's Atlas Minor.
The mapping of the Russian Empire includes conventional signs of Siberian towns, like Tobolsk, Nerchinsk, Irkutsk and Yakutsk; as well as places of nomadic settlement and centers of the Khans, the headmen of the Tartars. The arctic island Novaia Zemlia is shown with a rounded shape and Lake Baikal stretches in an east-west direction. Kamchatka is shown, but is misshapen and extends to Korea and Japan. The Great Wall of China is also curiously depicted.
A striking baroque style title cartouche provides us with an allegorical scene with Peter the Great as a seemingly holy figure. The emperor is shown floating amongst the clouds, flanked by two angels. Seeing this apparition, shepherds and hunters can be seen dropping to their knees.

The atlas in which this map was found - the Atlas Minor - is a fine and comprehensive composite atlas, and one of a series of large atlases compiled and sold by the Visscher family of art dealers and cartographers in the 17th century.
Founded by Nicholas Visscher, his work is known for the high quality of engraving, exceptionally fine ornament, and accurate geographical information. No two of the Visscher atlases seem to have been identical in content, and most contain, like this one, a selection of maps by the Visschers themselves, as well as other cartographers. In addition to the map of Russia, there is a striking world map by Allard with its black background and numerous projections, and found in the "Atlas Major" from about 1705, there are maps of the continents, regional maps of Europe, ten maps of Asia, and seven maps related to America.
For more information on this map, or a warm welcome to see other maps and books of our collection at 72nd Street NYC, please contact Natalie Zadrozna.