PLANCIUS, Petrus (1552-1622). ). Orbis Terrarum Tyous de Integro Multis in Locus Emendatus […] Amsterdam: 1590.

$ 5,000.00

PLANCIUS, Petrus (1552-1622). ). Orbis Terrarum Tyous de Integro Multis in Locus Emendatus […] Amsterdam: 1590. 

Single Sheet engraved map. 11 ½ x 20 ¼ inches sheet; 22 ½ x 31 ½ inches framed (good impression, full margins).

An early excellent double hemisphere maps of the world after Mercator's World Map (1587). Second state, with the addition of the label "Magallanica" to the Southern continents. Dutch biblical text on verso. Uncolored as published. First map to use decorative pictorial borders.
At the time of its publication, Plancius's large-scale, overwhelmingly detailed and decorative map of the world represented innovations in mapmaking on several levels. A minister of the Reformed Church in Holland, Plancius became an expert on navigation and on Dutch explorations to the Indies. He was one of the first to appreciate the significance of earlier Portuguese charts, and in 1602 was appointed official cartographer to the Dutch East India Company. As such, he had access to privileged information regarding the latest geographical discoveries, information not available to many of his competitors. This world map was first issued separately in 1594 or shortly thereafter, engraved by Jan van Doetecum, a craftsman of great skill whose signature appears in the lower left-hand corner and who was associated with a number of Plancius's maps. Korea is drawn as a peninsula for the first time ever on a map, and Japan is shown with an improved, if still not entirely correct, outline. New Guinea, which had previously been represented as a separate island, is now joined to the southern continent named "Magallanica". The elaborate pictorial borders were inspired by drawings in the works of Theodore de Bry, published a few years earlier, and were another of Plancius's innovations that established a pattern of cartographical decoration that lasted for over a century. Symbolical female figures, landscape vignettes, and highly animated illustrations of animals indigenous to each area represent the regions of the world. Included are elephants and camels, a giraffe, a unicorn, an ostrich, the footless bird of paradise, parrots, snakes, monkeys, a rhinoceros, a crocodile, and a giant armadillo. Plancius's map had a widespread influence on other mapmakers and is rarely available to collectors. References: Rodney W. Shirley, The Mapping of the World (London, 1983), n. 187. For more information on this map, or a warm welcome to see other maps and books of our collection at 72nd Street NYC, please contact Natalie Zadrozna.