ORTELIUS, Abraham (1527-1598). "Indiae Orientalis Isularumque Adiacientium Typus". Antwerp: Ortelius, c 1612.

$ 8,500.00

ORTELIUS, Abraham (1527-1598). "Indiae Orientalis Isularumque Adiacientium Typus". Antwerp: Ortelius, c 1612. 

Single sheet, matted (13 5/8 x 19 4/8 inches to the neat line, full margins showing the platemark).

A striking and fine engraved map of the Indian Ocean, Southeast Asia, Japan, and the Philippines; with a small section of the western coast of California. Featured are also the Islands of the Indian Ocean, including the Northern coastline of New Guinea described as being part of the southern continent, also showing Beach and other information drawn from Marco Polo.
The map is decorated extensively beginning with the title in a fine strapwork cartouche lower left and armorial device upper left, decorated with fine mermaids, sea monsters and ships, with "cum Privilegio" lower right, all surrounded by a broad decorative border. From an edition of Abraham Ortelius's celebrated "Theatrum orbis terrarium..." which he compiled using his many contacts in the growing network of European cartographers to secure the best existing maps. "Indiae Orientalis..." is based upon Mercator's world map of 1569, which he then had re-engraved by the talented Flemish artist Frans Hogenberg (1535-90) so that it conformed to a standard format and graphic style. Abraham Ortelius first published his atlas, "Theatrum orbis terrarium" in 1570, and as Rodney Shirley noted in his study of world maps, ushered in an era when "pre-eminence in map publishing was transferred from Italy to the Netherlands, leading to over a hundred years of Dutch supremacy in all facets of cartographical production." Ortelius was a true pioneer in map publishing, and his innovations brought momentous changes to the world views of contemporary Europeans. Little is known about his training and early career, but his true accomplishment, was the publication of the "Theatrum". The result was an atlas that was truly without precedent. Previously, collections of maps had been assembled into book form, but none conformed to the modern definition of the geographical world atlas. For more information on this map, or a warm welcome to see other maps and books of our collection at 72nd Street NYC, please contact Natalie Zadrozna.