SCOLARI, Stefano (C. 1598-1665) BLAEU, Willem Jansz (1571-1638). Nova Et Accurata Totius Germaniae Tabula. Venice. Stefano Scolari [Ca. 1650].

$ 48,000.00

SCOLARI, Stefano (C. 1598-1665) BLAEU, Willem Jansz (1571-1638). Nova Et Accurata Totius Germaniae Tabula. Venice. Stefano Scolari [Ca. 1650].

Six sheets joined, mounted on canvas. Canvas size 42 x 50 inches. Hand-colored. Title at top border with “Willem Janss Blaeuw Men Vintse te coop tot Amsterdam op ‘t Water inde Sonnewyser” placed lower left (paper a bit browned, slight paper loss at edges).

Italian edition, first published by Blaeu in 1646. With EXCEEDINGLY RARE HAND-COLORING. Nearly identical in arrangement, decoration, and content to the Blaeu state. Though the Italian copy does not include a reference to publisher or engraver, it likely originated from the Venetian publisher Stefano Scolari, who engraved this copy of “Nova Et Accurata Totius Germaniae Tabula” to use as a model for a complete new set of copperplates. Over the course of his career, Scolari published many copy engravings of decorative wall maps of both Italian and foreign origin during the mid-seventeenth century. ONLY THREE OTHER COPIES OF THIS MAP ARE KNOWN TO SCHILDER (“Monumenta Cartographica Neerlandica”) in Augsburg Uni Bibl, Harry Ranson Humanities Research Center of the Uni or Texas (formerly Kraus), and the Niewodnicszanski Collection.

Willem Janszoon Blaeu was born at Alkmaar in 1571 and trained in astronomy and the sciences by Tycho Brahe, the celebrated Danish astronomer.  In 1599, Blaeu began to make globes and instruments.  However, it was not long before the business expanded to include publishing maps, topographical works and books of sea charts.  His great skill was recognised by the Dutch East India Company and in 1630 he was appointed their official cartographer, giving him access to the most accurate geographical information available.  During his prodigious career Willem Blaeu was to produce several atlases including the Atlantis Appendix of 1630.   Five years later, the first two volumes of his planned world atlas, Atlas Novus or the Theatrum Orbis Terrarum were issued.  In 1638, Willem Blaeu died and the work was continued by his very capable sons, Joan and Cornelis.   

Reference: Schilder, Gunter. Monumenta Cartographica Neerlandica. Vol. V. Utrecht University, Holland (pp. 282-289). Catalogued by Annie Morony