MURNER, Thomas (1475-1537) - FLITTNER, Johann (1618-1678). Nebulo nebulonum; hoc est, Jocoseria modernae nequitiae censura. Frankfurt am Main: Jacobus de Zetter, 1620

$ 1,500.00

MURNER, Thomas (1475-1537) - FLITTNER, Johann (Fl. 1618-1625). Nebulo nebulonum; hoc est, Jocoseria modernae nequitiae censura. Frankfurt am Main: Jacobus de Zetter, 1620

8vo., (6 x 3 6/8 inches). Engraved title-page (page [iv] upper corner renewed). 33 engraved illustrations in the text. Modern panelled vellum over paste-board by Samelanx and Weckesser, yapp fore-edges, lettered in gilt on the spine.

Provenance: with 20th-century bibliographical notes on the front endpapers; modern armorial bookplate of Bibliotheque I.G. Schorsch on the verso of the front free endpaper

First edition in Latin, translated by Johann Flittner, of Murner's 1512 Schelmenzunft, a satirical gallery of rogues patterned after Sebastian Brant's Narrenschiff.

Murner is considered by many to be amongst the greatest German satirists of the 16th-century. "During the epoch immediately preceding and during the early years of the Reformation, three figures are especially prominent among the loyal champions of the Church in Germany, namely Johann Geller von Kaysersberg, his friend, Sebastian, the well-known satirist, and Thomas Murner, the ablest and most formidable of Luther's opponents... In his "Schelmenzunft" Murner deals with the same subject as Brant's "Narrenschiff", but his work is entirely original in treatment and far surpasses the earlier work in its popular appeal, its wit, and its vigour degenerating, indeed, at times into coarseness. His subsequent satires, "Gäuchmatt" (Fools' Meadow) and "Die Mühle von Schwindelsheim und Gretmüllerin Jahrzeit", in which he severely criticizes a special kind of fools, the "fools of love", form a kind of sequel to the "Schelmenzunft". There is no station, either clerical or lay, that is spared from his castigation" (Catholic Encycopedia). Lipperheide (1963) 681