HARDING, Karl Ludwig (1865-1934). Atlas Novus Coelestis XXVII Tabulis Continens Stellas Inter Polum Borealem et Trigesimum Gradual Declinationis Observatas. Halle: H.W. Schmidt, [1856]

$ 3,200.00

HARDING, Karl Ludwig (1865-1934). Atlas Novus Coelestis XXVII Tabulis Continens Stellas Inter Polum Borealem et Trigesimum Gradual Declinationis Observatas. [OR] Neuer Himmelsatlas von 27 Tafeln enthaltend die bis jetzt zwischen dem Nordpol und dem 30. Grade sudlicher Abweichung beobachteten Sterne. Halle: H.W. Schmidt, [1856].

Folio (21 4/8 x 15 inches). Additional engraved title-page in Latin, folding dedication leaf and Index. 27 double-page engraved celestial charts, mounted on guards (10th-century half brown morocco, drab paper boards (a bit marked).

Provenance: Richard Green Library of Important Scientific Books, his sale, Christie's New York, 3rd December 2007, lot 314

Second edition, first published in 1822. 

Harding's most important published work was this, his Atlas novus coelestis, which catalogued more than 120,000 stars. Although John Herschel dominated the discovery of nebulae, with 466 to his credit, Harding discovered 8 of the 9 recorded by other astronomers, and he also discovered, in 1804, the planet Juno, the third minor planet to be detected. Three comets, in 1813, 1824, and 1832 are also credited to him. He studied at the University of Göttingen under Georg Lichtenberg, later served as assistant to J.H. Schröter at Schröter’s Lilienthal Observatory, and in 1805 returned as a professor to Göttingen, where he remained until his death. Catalogued by Kate Hunter