GRAY, Andrew Belcher (1820-1862). Report of the Secretary of the Interior... and map of A.B. Gray, relative to the Mexican boundary. 33d Congress, 2d Session. Senate. Ex Doc. No 55. Washington: 1855.

$ 1,400.00

GRAY, Andrew Belcher (1820-1862). Report of the Secretary of the Interior, in Compliance with a resolution of the Senate, of January 22, communication a report and map of A.B. Gray, relative to the Mexican boundary. 33d Congress, 2d Session. Senate. Ex Doc. No 55. Washington: 1855.

8vo., (8 6/8 x 5 4/8 inches). Two exceptionally fine folding lithographed maps. Disbound.

The two maps are:

"That Part of Disturnell's Treaty Map in the Vicinity of the Rio Grande and Southern Boundary of New Mexico as referred to by U. S. Surveyor, in Communication to Commissioner, July 25 1851", showing "Bartlett & Conde's Line Traced Off and the True Situation of the Parallels with Reference to Natural Objects in the Vicinity Shewn", and including the note "The Santa Fe Road Was Laid out in 1825. Distance from Independence to Taos 730 Miles-To Santa Fe 840 Miles"

2 sheets, joined: "Map of that Portion of the Boundary between the United States and Mexico, from the Pacific Coast to the Junction of the Gila and Colorado Rivers, Surveyed under the Direction of Hon. John B. Weller...and the Rio Gila from Near Its Intersection, with the Southern Boundary of New Mexico, Surveyed under the Direction of John R. Bartlett...", with an inset "Sketch of the Port of San Diego Surveyed by the U. S. Boundary Commission in 1849 and 1850...", and a "Profile of Country from the Rio Grande to the Gulf of California, and from the Rio Grande to the Junction of the Gila and Colorado Rivers".

Gray began surveying as a teenager and helped Capt. Andrew Talcott in the survey of the Mississippi River delta. Between 1839 and 1840 he served the Republic of Texas and Gen. Memucan Hunt in surveying the United States-Texas boundary. "He also surveyed the copper-rich Keweenaw Peninsula, part of Michigan that protrudes into Lake Superior. He spent the Mexican War in North Texas and was appointed the principal surveyor of the United States-Mexican border after the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848.

"Work for the survey began at San Diego, California, as did the personal, professional, and political conflict that marked it. Among other disputes in the surveying party, Gray is said to have shot and wounded boundary commissioner Col. John B. Weller in San Diego. The treaty had set parameters according to Disturnell's map, but when the commission began work in Texas, Gray realized that this map was faulty and that the United States and Texas stood to lose valuable land if it were used. Particularly at stake was the area Gray considered the only practicable southern railroad route to the Pacific. John R. Bartlett, the commissioner appointed after Weller's controversial removal, had determined that the map would be followed but corrected in the process. The disagreement between Gray and Bartlett became so acrimonious that Gray was replaced by William H. Emory. Gray subsequently published his report on the Mexican boundary survey, Survey of a Route for the Southern Pacific Railroad, on the 32nd Parallel (1856)" (Handbook of Texas online).