GARCIA Y CUBAS, Antonio (1832-1912). Atlas Geográfico de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos: Obra compuesta de 30 cartas de los estados, Distrito Federal y territorios de la Baja California y Tepic. Mexico: Cadena y Ca., 1897.

$ 7,500.00

GARCIA Y CUBAS, Antonio (1832-1912). Atlas Geográfico de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos: Obra compuesta de 30 cartas de los estados, Distrito Federal y territorios de la Baja California y Tepic. Mexico: Cadena y Ca., 1897.

Folio (21 x 14 inches). 30 double-page chromolithograph regional maps of Mexico, each within broad silver border and fully colored, each  map with integral finger tab titled in contemporary manuscript (title-page excised, quite browned). Contemporary half brown sheep, black cloth, gilt (very worn).

Provenance: Contemporary ink stamp of G. Águila on verso of each map; with Dorothy Sloan, December 11th, 2009, lot 16

Exceptionally rare, in any condition, first published in 1886 by Debray under the same title, but with the addition of the silver borders which obscure the original 1886 title and imprint that are part of the original plate. Only two copies recorded on OCLC: UT Austin (Benson) and Getty.

Each regional map is very detailed, with a key to towns, haciendas, ranchos, mines, anchorages, roads, and railroads, waterways, lakes, soundings, and mountain ranges. The map of the Federal District is decorated with eight vignettes showing floor plans of several buildings, Mexico City in pre-Hispanic times, a modern street plan, and Mexican antiquities. Several of the maps also have insets, such as the one of Guerrero, which has an inset of the “Puerto de Acapulco,” and Sinaloa, with an inset of “Mazatlán.” Recent realignments of state borders are labelled and shown in red (e.g. Nuevo León).

"This atlas is emblematic of the progress and development in Mexico during Porfirio Díaz’s tenure as President. One such feature, for example, is the depiction of railroads, either existing or under consideration. As the map of Oaxaca shows, the elusive cross-Tehuantepec road is still “en estudio”; by contrast, Puebla is well served at this time by railways both public and private. The fine details of each map and the excellent workmanship reflect not only progress in defining and developing Mexico’s geography but also embody the height of late nineteenth-century Mexican lithographic art" (Dorothy Sloan). Palau 98722. Phillips, Atlases 2687. Rumsey 5758. Catalogued by Kate Hunter