d'APRES DE MANNEVILLETTE, Jean-Baptiste-Nicolas-Denis (1707-1780). Carte Reduite de L'Ocean Oriental depuis le Cap de Bonne Esperance, jusqu'au Japon. Paris: chez Dezauche, 1771.

$ 2,500.00

d'APRES DE MANNEVILLETTE, Jean-Baptiste-Nicolas-Denis (1707-1780). Carte Reduite de L'Ocean Oriental depuis le Cap de Bonne Esperance, jusqu'au Japon... Dresse sure les Memoires, Routiers, et Journaux des plus habiles navigateurs, Assujettis aux observations astronomiques les plus exactes, a celles de l'Auteur en particulier, et a ses Remarques. Paris: chez Dezauche, Charge de l'Entrepot general des Cartes de la marine du Roi des Noyers pres celle des Anglois, et a l'Orient, chez M. Duquenel, place Espremenil, 1771.

Single sheet (23 2/8 x 35 4/8 inches, full margins, showing the plate mark). A fine map of the Indian Ocean, showing Africa, Borneo, Sumatra and Java, the Arabian Peninsula and the western half of Australia, with rhumb lines, soundings, lines of latitude and longitude (old folds).

Second and revised edition, first published in 1753, and based on the map of the Indian Ocean by Bellin, first published in 1740, which in turn filled in the gaps left deliberately from the charts of the VOC, and corrected the mistakes in the published Dutch charts of Goos and van Keulen. The Dutch had dominated the trading route between the Cape of Good Hope and Java throughout the 17th-century before the French made successful inroads in the second quarter of the 18th-century. 

d'Apres de Mannevillette, the celebrated French cartographer had a long and distinguished career in the French East India Company. He studied under the famous Guillaume Delisle, the King's geographer, and was one of the first navigators to make use of Hadley's revolutionary octant in taking measurements at sea.  During his many voyages d'Apres de Mannevillette created a number of charts for a hydrographic atlas which, with the support of the Academie des Sciences, was published in Paris in 1745 under the title "Le Neptune Oriental" with 25 maps. For the next thirty years, with the help of his friend and eminent British hydrographer Alexander Dalrymple, d'Apres de Mannevillette revised his charts for a second and enlarged edition. This comprehensive atlas was used on all French ships, and by some foreign ones too, navigating the Indian Ocean. It replaced the "English Pilot" published by John Thornton in 1700 and the charts of the van Keulens, the hydrographers of the Dutch East India Company