D'ANVILLE, Jean Baptiste Bourguignon (1697-1782). Nouvel Atlas de la Chine, de la Tartarie Chinoise, et du Thibet. The Hague: Henri Scheurleer, 1737.

$ 28,500.00

D'ANVILLE, Jean Baptiste Bourguignon (1697-1782). Nouvel Atlas de la Chine, de la Tartarie Chinoise, et du Thibet: Contenant Les Cartes generale & particulieres de ces Pays, ainsi que la Carte du Royaume de Coree.The Hague: Henri Scheurleer, 1737. 

Folio (21 4/8 x 17 inches). Title-page printed in red and black (margins of text leaves expertly repaired with some renewal).  42 maps, including 3 fine double-page and folding engraved general maps of China, Tartarie and Tibet, China and Tartary, all with original hand-colour in outline (some expert repairs to folds on versos), 9 uncoloured double-page and 30 full-page regional maps (some expert and discreet marginal repairs). Modern half tan calf, brown paper boards, red morocco lettering-piece in one.  

D'Anville's spectacular comprehensive atlas of China, Tartary and Tibet is the second western atlas of China, following that of Martinus Martini published by Blaeu in 1655. It is absolutely the first scientific cartographical survey of China. Executed by French Jesuits, at the behest of the Emperor Kang Hsi, it forms the most important cartographic record of China from the eighteenth century.   The maps were first published in Du Halde's "Description… de l'Empire de la China", 1735. The maps provide not only the first accurate depiction of the Pacific coastline and the first maps of the more remote areas of China, Tibet and Mongolia, but also the first separate map of Korea by a European cartographer and the first printed map to illustrate Bering's first voyage.  Following the death of Guillaume Delisle, Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d'Anville continued the line of progressive French cartographers which had begun with Nicolas Sanson in the previous century. He was a scrupulous editor of maps and his work spanned most of the eighteenth century. He was concerned equally with the classical and modern worlds and he was continually updating the geographical content of his maps. Catalogued by Kate Hunter