CAMPBELL, Dr. John (1708-1775) , or possibly William PITT (1708-1778). A Speech without Doors, In Answer to a Supposed Speech within; On the Merits of the great Cause of Aylesbury versus Buckingham. London: Printed for A. Moore, near St. Paul's, 1748.

$ 100.00

CAMPBELL, Dr. John (1708-1775) , or possibly William PITT (1708-1778). A Speech without Doors, In Answer to a Supposed Speech within; On the Merits of the great Cause of Aylesbury versus Buckingham. London: Printed for A. Moore, near St. Paul's, 1748.

Folio (12 x 7 4/8 inches). 11-pages. Half-title. Woodcut printer's device on title-page. Self-wrappers, removed from a sammelband (old folds, thumbed).

Following the political dispute in Buckinghamshire, where the Grenville family sought to disable their principal opponent in the county, Lord Chief Justice Willes, by seeking an act of parliament moving the assizes and with them much political power from Aylesbury to the Grenville stronghold at Buckingham. "Although Buckingham is the county town and certainly took the place of county town in the Domesday Survey, it was early found that the natural position of Aylesbury made it by far the more suitable meeting-place. Consequently assizes were held at Aylesbury from 1218 onwards and probably before that year. The 'Sessions House' was also the market hall. In the 17th century attempts were made to remove the summer assizes to Buckingham. A new County Hall, a red brick building with stone dressings, said to have been designed by Sir John Vanbrugh, at the south-east end of the Market Square, was built about 1727 and the sessions moved there from a hired tenement, probably the market-house. From 1724 to 1728 the custom of holding summer assizes at Buckingham prevailed, and in 1748 it was confirmed by Act of Parliament after considerable dissension between the rival towns" ("A History of the County of Buckingham": Volume 3, London, 1925, page 5). ESTC T87785. 

[BOUND WITH].

King Harry the Ninth's Speech to both House of P---------T. The 31st Day of November, 1647. London: Printed fro H. Carpenter, in Fleet-Street.

6-pages. Satirical broadside against King Charles I and his endeavors to intervene in the Thirty Years War still raging in Europe (1618-1648). "Should any unforseen Accidents again prevent the Ru---ns from joining our Army, or frustrate my acquiring those Troops, for the Service of the Public, which I am at Present doing my endeavours to obtain; even then, I do not despair, with the Assistance of my loving people, of gaining sufficient Succours from the remotest Parts; and in order to be prepared against all Events, I shall cause immediate Appklication to be made on this Account of the Sophi of Persia, as soon as the Succession to that Kingdom shall be settled. The Force that I may expect from thence, together with those that I shall sollicit from the Cham of Tartary, the Kings of Bantam, Siam, and the Great Mogul, will be rather more than sufficient, for making Head against the Enemy; especially, as with Troops of the latter, I expect to recieve a considerable Number of Elephants, furnished with well fortified Castles on their Backs, which Moving Forts will be a great Annoyance to the French, and afford them sufficient Diversion from making such dreadful Havock as they have lately done, with the most impregnable Places in the N-lands, and United P-ces." ESTC - T17117.