BUNTING, Heinrich (1545 - 1606). "Jerusalem die Heilige Viereckete Stadt/ in grund gelegt und eigentlich abgemalet". Leipzig: Johan Beyer for Johan Franck, 1585.

$ 750.00

BUNTING, Heinrich (1545 - 1606). "Jerusalem die Heilige Viereckete Stadt/ in grund gelegt und eigentlich abgemalet". Leipzig: Johan Beyer for Johan Franck, 1585.

Single Sheet (sheet size 12 x 15 1/4 inches). (Good impression, ageing, corner margin missed).

This beautifully rare woodcut view of the holy city of Jerusalem is depicted as seen from the east. It includes numerous place names, in and around the walled city, such as Kings David' and Solomon's temples, the Olive trees Mount, etc. At the upper left the city of Bethlehem is shown.
From Bunting's Itinerarium Sacrae Scripturae. Das ist Ein Reisebuch, [-ander Theil] uber di gantze Heilige Schrifft. -- De monetis et mensuris sacrae scripturae.
First published in 1581, Bunting's celebrated biblical geography includes his famous world map showing the three continents of Europe, Asia and Africa on a cloverleaf projection with Jerusalem at the centre, the eastern coast of South America appears on the far left, England and Scandinavia in the north (Shirley 142). The ocean contains several mermaids, sea-monsters and a beautiful ship off the coast of America. Other maps of the Holy Land, Egypt, and views of Jerusalem and the Temple of Solomon.
In the year the 'Itinarium' was published, it marked the start of the Anglo-Spanish War and France had entered a 'seventh' War of Religion against the Huguenots.
A few years earlier in 1554, the great King of Spain acquired the claim to the Kingdom of Jerusalem; from his father Charles I. The title was formally claimed by various European dynasties and royal houses; however, none of them made any true attempt to actually reign over the territory of Jerusalem. It was most frequently used as a symbol of power over the land, but always convenient during times of War - such as how Philip II used this title in addition to financing the Catholic league to further his agenda of vanquishing the French Calvinists.
The Itinerarium was an exceedingly popular work, running to ten editions in seven languages over a period of seventy years from its first publication. The book describes the travels of the religious figures of the Old and New Testaments of the Bible as well as its geography, accompanied by some interesting maps that take more than a little liberty with the actualities.
For more information on this map, or a warm welcome to see other maps and books of our collection at 72nd Street NYC, please contact Natalie Zadrozna.