BARRIER TREATY. The Treaty between Her Majesty and the States General, for Securing the Succession to the Crown of Great Britain, and for Settling a Barrier for the States General against France. London: Samuel Keble, 1712.

$ 250.00

BARRIER TREATY. The Treaty between Her Majesty and the States General, for Securing the Succession to the Crown of Great Britain, and for Settling a Barrier for the States General against France; with the Extracts of Letters and Paper relating thereunto: Which have been laid before the House of Commons, pursuant to their Addresses to Her Majesty for the same. London: Printed for Samuel Keble at the Turk's Head in Fleet Street, and Henry Clements at the Half-Moon in s. Paul's Church-yard. 1712.

Folio (12 4/8 x 8 inches). 18-pages (a bit browned). Wood-engraved head-piece, woodcut initials. Self wrappers, removed from a sammelband. 

Reprinting the first "Barrier Treaty" of 1709, also known as the Treaty of Den Haag or the Treaty of The Hague between Great Britain and the States-General of the United Provinces, by which the United Provinces promised to guarantee the Protestant succession in England from within the 'serene' House of Hanover, and Great Britain promised to secure and take by force if necessary, the towns of Veurne, Nieuwpoort, Ypres, Menen, Lille, Tournai, Condé, Valenciennes, Maubeuge, Charleroi, Namur, Halle, Damme, Dendermonde and Ghent, so creating a barrier between the Dutch and the French.

The project of giving the States-General a "barrier" against France "by means of a line of fortresses along the frontier had been raised in the Grand Alliance negotiations of 1701, and again in 1703, but was defeated by the hostility of Austria. In 1709, however, a treaty was concluded between England and Holland, by which the former bound herself to obtain for the Dutch the right of supplying garrisons for the Flemish fortresses, including Ypres, Menin, Lille, Tournai, Conde, Valenciennes, Charleroi, Namur, Damm, and Dendermonde. The treaty was signed by Townshend on the part of England, as Marlborough refused to be a party to it. The arrangements were revised and considerably altered, much to the disadvantage of the Dutch, by a second agreement which was come to in 1713, in which the number of barrier fortresses was greatly curtailed. The treaty was, however, not definitively signed till Nov. 16, 1715. The chief provisions were that the Low Countries were guaranteed to the house of Austria, and were not to be alienated on any conditions whatsoever. The Dutch were to garrison Namur, Tournai, Menin, Furncs, Warncton, Ypres, and Knoque; and Dendermonde was to be garrisoned jointly by Dutch and Austrian troops. The Dutch were very dissatisfied at this curtailment in the number of town9 ceded to them, and still more so at the commercial stipulations by which England was put on the same footing with Holland, as regards the commerce of the Belgian towns. But the treaty was altogether a disturbing element in European politics, and an especial source of friction in the relations of England and Austria. It was one of the causes of the alienation of England and Austria previous to the beginning of the eleven Years' War. The Barrier Treaty was annulled by the Treaty of Fontainebleau, 1785" (Low and Pulling "The Dictionary of English History", 1910, page 135).