ACKERMANN, Rudolph (publisher).The Repository of Arts, Literature, Commerce, Manufactures, Fashions and Politics. Series I- Series III. London: Rudolph Ackermann, January 1809 - December 1828

$ 10,500.00

ACKERMANN, Rudolph (publisher).The Repository of Arts, Literature, Commerce, Manufactures, Fashions and Politics. Series I- Series III. London: Rudolph Ackermann, January 1809 - December 1828

Together 40 volumes (9 4/8 x 5 4/8 inches). Illustrated with over 1400 plates (many hand-colored), paper and fabric specimens etc (lacking most patterns, as well as a few plates, some plates loose or laid in from another copy, especially in the later volumes. First series tan calf backed brown paper boards; Second and Third series, tan calf backed marbled paper boards (some bindings defective with boards detached and most rubbed and worn, internally generally clean).

The Repository of Arts, "a monthly magazine, begun in 1809, featuring fashion and social and literary news, continued for twenty years, during which time 1432 hand-coloured plates appeared in it. It remains an important sourcebook for Regency style and fashions. Ackermann employed not only the architectural draughtsman Augustus Pugin, but also a figure drawer of genius, Thomas Rowlandson, who filled the interior views of London's landmark buildings with convincing life' (John Ford for DNB).

This vast compilation is the foremost journal of the period, and both dictated and documented the tastes of the English Regency. Issued monthly between January 1809 and December 1828, it features exceptionally fine hand-colored aquatint plates on diverse subjects, including views, the latest fashions in women's dress, furniture designs, specimens of papers, upholstery and dress fabrics etc. The journal was an absolute prerequisite in fashionable homes of the period. The text covers all areas of endeavor, including the arts and sciences, travel, sports, literature, etc. etc., almost ad infinitum. Ackermann's great shop on the Strand in London (named The Repository of Arts, appropriately) sold his prints and illustrated books, as well as a wide range of other materials. It remained a popular destination until it closed in 1856, though Ackermann himself died in 1834; the print shop Ackermann & Son continued until 1992. Tooley 8; Abbey Life 212.