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FADEN, William (1749-1836) and STEDMAN, C. (1753-1812). Plan of the Position which the Army under Lt. Genl. Buroione Took at Saratoga on the 10th of September 1777 and in which it Remained till the Convention was Signed. London: Bargoyne, 1793.

FADEN, William (1749-1836) and STEDMAN, C. (1753-1812). Plan of the Position which the Army under Lt. Genl. Buroione Took at Saratoga on the 10th of September 1777 and in which it Remained till the Convention was Signed. London: Bargoyne, 1793.

1,500.00

FADEN, William (1749-1836) and STEDMAN, C. (1753-1812). Plan of the Position which the Army under Lt. Genl. Buroione Took at Saratoga on the 10th of September 1777 and in which it Remained till the Convention was Signed. London: Bargoyne, 1793.

Single sheet (10 x 20 ½ inches) (Staining, paper tone)

An excellent and important early battle plan, showing the position of the British and American Troops following the second battle of Saratoga.

General John Burgoyne (24 February 1722 - 4 August 1792) was a British army officer, politician and dramatist. He first saw action during the Seven Years' War when he participated in several battles, most notably during the Portugal Campaign of 1762.
John Burgoyne is best known for his role in the American Revolutionary War. He designed an invasion scheme and was appointed to command a force moving south from Canada to split away New England and end the rebellion. Burgoyne advanced from Canada but his slow movement allowed the Americans to concentrate their forces. Instead of coming to his aid according to the overall plan, the British Army in New York City moved south to capture Philadelphia. Surrounded, Burgoyne fought two small battles near Saratoga to break out.
Following the first battle, Burgoyne took a defensive position, while the Americans withdrew to wait for his next move. Burgoyne marched out and was attacked by Gates on both flanks. While his army survived the battle, the consequences were quite severe. With his supplies running low and his escape blocked by the American, Burgoyne set up a final defensive camp near Saratoga, where he remained until he negotiated terms of surrender on Oct. 17, 1777. The battle was a major turning point in the American Revolution, as it was the American's first major victory and contributed significantly to the French decision to back the Americans.
"…was a great turning point of the war, because it won for Americans the foreign assistance which was the last element needed for victory". (Morgan)

Originally engraved by Faden, the map shows the final encampment of Burgoyne's army, including troop placements and defenses across the Fish Kill from Saratoga and the American positions surrounding the British, including Gates' main army to the south of the Fish Kill, Morgan's riflemen in the woods to the west, and General Fellows troops blocking the escape route across the Hudson on the east.
For more information on this map, or a warm welcome to see other maps and books of our collection at 72nd Street NYC, please contact Natalie Zadrozna.

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